Instructions for Fitting Flap Type Seals

Fitting and Adjustment Procedures:

  1. Completely remove the screws from the upper top half of the liner and replace old seal with new one.
  2. Put screws back by pushing screws through flap of seal. Lightly tighten up.
  3. Continue to do the same on the left and then right side. Except that the screws have to be inserted from bottom up while pushing the bottom corners up the lengths. Then do the rest of the seal the same way.
  4. Smear some lubricants, like vaseline, onto the hinge side of the seal, especially at the corners and shut the door. If the door close smoothly, but there are gaps on the top or bottom corners of handle side, then hold the top and bottom corners with your hands and try to twist, either in clockwise or anti-clockwise direction, until gaps are reduced or disappear.
  5. Then use a very strong hand held fan hair dryer to soften up the seals all around, with the door closed to get rid of any remaining gaps.
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Instructions for Fitting Bead Type Seals

Fitting and Adjustment Procedures:

  1. Slacken off screws to allow seal to be slipped out from under recess.
  2. With side of seal marked 'Hinge-Side', (if any), in correct position, push in new seal behind groove paying particular attention to the corners.
  3. Lightly tighten the screws across the top after the seal is in place (the bead part of the seal should be completely hidden underneath the metal or plastic groove of linings). Then lightly tighten the screws working from bottom up while pushing the bottom corners up the lengths. Then lightly tighten all the other screws.
  4. Smear some lubricants, like vaseline, onto the hinge side of the seal, especially at the corners and shut the door. If the door close smoothly, but there is gaps on the top or bottom corners of handle side, then hold the top and bottom corners with your hands and try to twist either in clockwise or anti-clockwise direction until gaps are reduced or disappear.
  5. Then use a very strong hand held fan hair dryers to soften up the seals all round, with the door closed to get rid of any remaining gaps.
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Help your refrigerators use less energy

Did you know that your refrigerator and freezer use one-sixth of all the electricity used in your home? Replacing that old, inefficient refrigerator with a new efficient model could save you two thirds of what you've been paying to keep your food cold.

Not everyone may be ready to buy a new refrigerator. But there are some easy things you can do to make your fridge run more efficiently - and save you money! Here are some tips:

  • Always keep liquids and food covered and wrapped. This prevents the release of moisture which makes the compressor work harder and uses more energy.
  • Make sure the door gasket is creating a tight seal. One way to test it is to close a dollar bill into the door. If it pulls out without resistance, its time to replace the gasket. For new refrigerators that use magnetic seals, put a flashlight inside the fridge, turn out the kitchen lights, and check for light leading through the seal.
  • Use the power saving switch or summer-winter switch, if your fridge has one. Many refrigerators run a small heater inside the walls to prevent moisture build-up - turning on the power saving switch will turn off this heater.
  • Don't let frost build up in the freezer.
  • That automatic ice tray can be a real power drain. Make ice the old fashioned way - in ice trays.
  • If possible, locate your refrigerator away from the stove or dishwasher and out of direct sunlight.
  • Keep your refrigerator temperature between 38F and 42F and the freezer between 10F and 15F. Use a thermometer - the refrigerator temperature dials won't give you the real temperature.
  • Try to keep the door to the fridge shut. Cold air escapes every time you open the door - don't keep it open while thinking about what to munch on and try not to keep opening and closing it repeatedly.
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Refrigerators trouble-shooting

The following is for information only. We can not be held responsible for any injuries to yourself or any one else for the repairs you may attempt. We also are not responsible for any damages you may cause to the equipment you may attempt to repair.

Refrigerator side getting warm, freezer still cold

  • Evaporator fan motor not running
  • Defrost timer not running
  • Defrost heater defective
  • Defrost thermostat open
  • Airflow blocked from freezer compartment
  • Fan blade broken
  • Defective door switch on older models

Refrigerator & Freezer compartments both are getting warm

  • Make sure refrigerator is plugged in and has power (are lights on inside?)
  • Condenser fan motor on bottom under refrigerator not running.
  • Defective defrost timer
  • Cold control defective
  • Compressor overload defective
  • Compressor relay defective

Freezer compartment getting hot

  • Defrost timer stuck in defrost cycle (replace)
  • Defrost thermostat stuck (replace)
  • Ice maker stuck in harvest cycle

Ice maker not making ice

  • Defective inlet water valve
  • Freezer temperature not cold enough (see problem # 2)
  • Defective thermostat in ice maker
  • Defective drive motor

Refrigerator sweating around door edges

  • Door gaskets leaking air
  • Defective mullion heaters
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